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INDICATIONS AND USAGE

DURYSTA (bimatoprost implant) is indicated for the reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients with open angle glaucoma (OAG) or ocular hypertension (OHT).

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Contraindications

DURYSTA is contraindicated in patients with: active or suspected ocular or periocular infections; corneal endothelial cell dystrophy (e.g., Fuchs’ Dystrophy); prior corneal transplantation or endothelial cell transplants (e.g., Descemet’s Stripping Automated Endothelial Keratoplasty [DSAEK]); absent or ruptured posterior lens capsule, due to the risk of implant migration into the posterior segment; hypersensitivity to bimatoprost or to any other components of the product.

Warnings and Precautions

The presence of DURYSTA implants has been associated with corneal adverse reactions and increased risk of corneal endothelial cell loss. Administration of DURYSTA should be limited to a single implant per eye without retreatment. Caution should be used when prescribing DURYSTA in patients with limited corneal endothelial cell reserve.

DURYSTA should be used with caution in patients with narrow iridocorneal angles (Shaffer grade < 3) or anatomical obstruction (e.g., scarring) that may prohibit settling in the inferior angle.

Macular edema, including cystoid macular edema, has been reported during treatment with ophthalmic bimatoprost, including DURYSTA intracameral implant. DURYSTA should be used with caution in aphakic patients, in pseudophakic patients with a torn posterior lens capsule, or in patients with known risk factors for macular edema.

Prostaglandin analogs, including DURYSTA, have been reported to cause intraocular inflammation. DURYSTA should be used with caution in patients with active intraocular inflammation (e.g., uveitis) because the inflammation may be exacerbated.

Ophthalmic bimatoprost, including DURYSTA intracameral implant, has been reported to cause changes to pigmented tissues, such as increased pigmentation of the iris. Pigmentation of the iris is likely to be permanent. Patients who receive treatment should be informed of the possibility of increased pigmentation. While treatment with DURYSTA can be continued in patients who develop noticeably increased iris pigmentation, these patients should be examined regularly.

Intraocular surgical procedures and injections have been associated with endophthalmitis. Proper aseptic technique must always be used with administering DURYSTA, and patients should be monitored following the administration.

Adverse Reactions

In controlled studies, the most common ocular adverse reaction reported by 27% of patients was conjunctival hyperemia. Other common adverse reactions reported in 5%-10% of patients were foreign body sensation, eye pain, photophobia, conjunctival hemorrhage, dry eye, eye irritation, intraocular pressure increased, corneal endothelial cell loss, vision blurred, iritis, and headache.

Please see full Prescribing Information.

 

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION AND INDICATIONS AND USAGE
COLLAPSE

Contraindications

DURYSTA is contraindicated in patients with: active or suspected ocular or periocular infections; corneal endothelial cell dystrophy (e.g., Fuchs’ Dystrophy); prior corneal transplantation or endothelial cell transplants (e.g., Descemet’s Stripping Automated Endothelial Keratoplasty [DSAEK]); absent or ruptured posterior lens capsule, due to the risk of implant migration into the posterior segment; hypersensitivity to bimatoprost or to any other components of the product.

Warnings and Precautions

The presence of DURYSTA implants has been associated with corneal adverse reactions and increased risk of corneal endothelial cell loss. Administration of DURYSTA should be limited to a single implant per eye without retreatment. Caution should be used when prescribing DURYSTA in patients with limited corneal endothelial cell reserve.

DURYSTA should be used with caution in patients with narrow iridocorneal angles (Shaffer grade < 3) or anatomical obstruction (e.g., scarring) that may prohibit settling in the inferior angle.

Macular edema, including cystoid macular edema, has been reported during treatment with ophthalmic bimatoprost, including DURYSTA intracameral implant. DURYSTA should be used with caution in aphakic patients, in pseudophakic patients with a torn posterior lens capsule, or in patients with known risk factors for macular edema.

Prostaglandin analogs, including DURYSTA, have been reported to cause intraocular inflammation. DURYSTA should be used with caution in patients with active intraocular inflammation (e.g., uveitis) because the inflammation may be exacerbated.

Ophthalmic bimatoprost, including DURYSTA intracameral implant, has been reported to cause changes to pigmented tissues, such as increased pigmentation of the iris. Pigmentation of the iris is likely to be permanent. Patients who receive treatment should be informed of the possibility of increased pigmentation. While treatment with DURYSTA can be continued in patients who develop noticeably increased iris pigmentation, these patients should be examined regularly.

Intraocular surgical procedures and injections have been associated with endophthalmitis. Proper aseptic technique must always be used with administering DURYSTA, and patients should be monitored following the administration.

Adverse Reactions

In controlled studies, the most common ocular adverse reaction reported by 27% of patients was conjunctival hyperemia. Other common adverse reactions reported in 5%-10% of patients were foreign body sensation, eye pain, photophobia, conjunctival hemorrhage, dry eye, eye irritation, intraocular pressure increased, corneal endothelial cell loss, vision blurred, iritis, and headache.

INDICATIONS AND USAGE

DURYSTA (bimatoprost implant) is indicated for the reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients with open angle glaucoma (OAG) or ocular hypertension (OHT).

Please see full Prescribing Information.